Video

What courage, indeed! I hope this bull elephant fully heals. What a great team Sky Vets has. Dr. Poghorn is amazing.

Elephant treated by Vet Team shows true courage

Published on Apr 23, 2014

Normally the physical removal of a poisoned arrow is a fairly simple and quick operation for experienced field vets, taking about fifteen minutes. This was going to be a different affair however, with the vet counting five arrow wounds on just one side of the sedated elephant.

Photoset

I’m glad other researchers don’t really start their day until 11 AM! Thank you, elephantskinny! 

elephantskinny:

A MUSHARA DAY - Morning

Sitting in one spot watching the animal world go by is not what one normally expects of an African safari. The typical safari requires a daily movement through the landscape where anonymous animals are glimpsed in a snapshot in time. At our field site at Mushara waterhole in Etosha National Park, we are stationary, and the ebb and flow of the animal denizens creates the motion and the sense of the passage of time around us.

Early morning is pretty quiet, especially if the resident lioness, Bobtail, and her pride are looking for breakfast. If not, a typical day would start with a large herd of eland coming in for a drink, then a tentative kudu family, followed by some springbok, the giraffe and then gaggles of zebra. At around 11 a.m. the first male elephants might show up for a drink and a bath. They are thankfully not early visitors to the water hole as that is usually our time to sleep after being kept up all night by the night eles. When the eles show up in the late morning, everyone puts down their cameras or the postcards they were writing and takes up their elephant stations, one at the video recorder, one at the i.d. book, one at the datalogger, another at the spotting scope and another grabs the dung map and the research day begins.

Photo
animals-plus-nature:

Move along Ma by Redkite33 on Flickr.
Photo
sydwiki:

some little elephants.

sydwiki:

some little elephants.

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Anonymous asked: Hello, I am helping some great pages on the Net to credit properly the photos they publish, and I am looking for the name of the photographer who too the photo of the baby elephant drinking water with his mouth. Can you help me? Thank you very much in advance for your answer! Looking forward! Best regards, Claire. mail: clairemedaisko free fr

Hi Claire! If you click on the photo, it takes you straight to the Pinterest page from which I took the photo. The caption is mine. However, I realized after reading your post that the photo is one of the few posts for which I did NOT provide a source. Mea culpa. I finally added a source. I can’t help you on the original source of the image itself. I know this post has gone viral via Reddit, Imgur, et al., and every time the image is with the caption — never just the image. Along the way, someone took the time to merge my caption with the photo to make one image! If you search under “baby elephant drinking”, you’ll see it online. I have not received any credit for it, but if you look for the caption and the image together, you won’t find it prior to my post — unless someone just messed up their date stuff. So, if you want to give me credit for the image w/the caption, please do. I’m Jewel Ward, and my other web site is tamingdata dot com. As for the photo itself, I can’t help you other than point you to Pinterest. Maybe Karyn Torkelson can help you? If you are interested in provenance, you can see my post on “wildeles dot org /search/viral” in which I discuss the path the image with my caption has gone. Again, I’m fascinated that it’s been reblogged and posted so many times…and always with the caption, never just the photo. Good luck, and please let me know if I can assist you further. Best Regards, Jewel/WildEles

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My guess is that the photo was taken in southeast Asia or at a zoo somewhere in a Western country.
Why do I see a chained elephant in the background.
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llbwwb:


(via 500px / Shaggy by Viktor Vlaskin)
Quote
"Myth: we have to save the earth. Frankly, the earth doesn’t need to be saved. Nature doesn’t give a hoot if human beings are here or not. The planet has survived cataclysmic and catastrophic changes for millions upon millions of years. Over that time, it is widely believed, 99 percent of all species have come and gone while the planet has remained. Saving the environment is really about saving our environment — making it safe for ourselves, our children, and the world as we know it. If more people saw the issue as one of saving themselves, we would probably see increased motivation and commitment to actually do so."

— Robert M. Lilienfeld, management consultant and author (b. 1953) and William L. Rathje, archaeologist and author (b. 1945) 

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Happy Earth Day!
What are you doing to celebrate?
Me, I’m working on my dissertation.
[Image source: spreadshirt.com.]

Happy Earth Day!

What are you doing to celebrate?

Me, I’m working on my dissertation.

[Image source: spreadshirt.com.]

Photoset

palaeoclimatology:

Elephants in Kruger

(via flying-green-elephant)

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menentk:

….And He Carried the Memory of Home….

menentk:

….And He Carried the Memory of Home….

(via yourdailyelephant)

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neonpringles:

elephant by *neisbeis
Link

war elephant was an elephant trained and guided by humans for combat. Their main use was to charge the enemy, trampling them and breaking their ranks and instilling terror. An elephantry is a cavalry unit containing elephant-mounted troops.[1] They were first employed in India, the practice spreading out across south-east Asia and westwards into the Mediterranean. Their most famous use in the West was by the Greek general Pyrrhus of Epirus and in significant numbers by the armies ofCarthage, including briefly by Hannibal.

In the Mediterranean, improved tactics reduced the value of the elephant in battle, while their availability in the wild also decreased. In the east, where supplies of animals were greater and the terrain ideal, it was the advent of the cannon that finally concluded the use of the combat elephant at the end of the 19th century, thereafter restricting their use to engineering and labour roles.

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ching-hsiang:

"The Wounding of Khan Kilan by a Rajput" 

ching-hsiang:

"The Wounding of Khan Kilan by a Rajput" 

Photo
alonjak:

Battle elephant in circa 1750 Rajasthan, anonymous artist.

alonjak:

Battle elephant in circa 1750 Rajasthan, anonymous artist.