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Queen City Cookies, Pure Shortbread Cookies.

[Source: Google Images.]

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Salute.
(OK, probably not, but that is what it looks like to me.)

Salute.

(OK, probably not, but that is what it looks like to me.)

(Source: flying-green-elephant)

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Blog by Robert Mwehe, Elephants and Bees Kenyan Intern, MSc student at Yale University

I first came to Mwakoma when Dr. Lucy made a call for interns to join her at the Tsavo Elephants and Bees Project site in June 2012. Since then, and prior to building the new research centre, I had been coming in and out of Mwakoma. In that period, I had never been within Mwakoma when elephants invaded the farms. I always got reports of how the elephants had entered the farms, ate this or that and, in rare circumstances, injured or killed residents within Mwakoma or, in the neighbouring villages. After the research centre was up and running, we had not heard anything to “excite” us. Things changed in June 2014.

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Photoset

Elephant Note Cards Customized with Your Name - Cute Gift Idea - Personalized Stationery - Proceeds Support Wildlife - Thank You (Set of 10)

These adorable note cards are made with high quality white cardstock, feature a hand drawn elephant illustration, and are customized with your name. Interior is blank. Accented with your choice of color shimmer envelope. They are perfect for sending out a heartfelt message or thank you while supporting a wonderful cause. Also makes a unique gift for any elephant lover!

They make great thank you cards too! Now you can choose ‘thank you from’ wording on the dropdown above.

This listing is for ::
TEN (10) Personalized Note Cards (3.5” x 5” folded)
— including your choice of shimmer envelopes

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Be sure to leave the NAME to use in the ‘notes to seller’ box in checkout!
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100% of your order’s proceeds will directly benefit The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya. At the heart of their program is the rescue and rehabilitation of young elephants tragically orphaned by ivory poachers. You can learn more here: http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org 

A special thanks to Kristin Bauer for introducing me to this organization and spreading conservation efforts with her ‘Out for Africa’ documentary. You can learn more here: http://outforafrica.com 

Together, we CAN make a difference in the world. ♥

Latest customer review of THESE cards:: 
"Wonderful quality, and so beautiful I almost think it would be a shame to write on them! Highly recommended!"
Thanks so much, Lindsay K.! 

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If you’re engaged, find hundreds of wedding items in shop here: 
https://www.etsy.com/shop/marrygrams

[Source: @dswt.]

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Baby elephant vs. a cat. 

Published on Jul 25, 2014

What do you think Navann, a baby elephant, would do when facing with a cat?

[Source: Buzzfeed.]

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yajifun:

An elephant and the soldier / Okuma Takeo, Kurosaki Yoshisuke

ゑとおはなし ざうとへいたいさん 大熊武雄 著 黒崎義介 絵 1943年

“いしづかそうちゃうは ひのまるのはたを もって ざうに のりました。こどもは ざうの はながしらをなでながら、いつ こしらへたか 小さい ひのまるのはたを ふりながら、とほくを ゆびさして、なにか いっしゃうけんめいに、ざうに いひきかせて ゐるやうでした。すると ざうは あるきだしました。”

“「ふしぎにも しぬべき いのちが 二ど たすかったのだ。こんどこそ いのちをすてて、てんのうへいかの おんためにたたかふぞ。あの ジャングルの なかの こどもたちを しあはせに してやる ために たたかふぞ。」”

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wildphotographicyouth:

No matter where you go; Go with all your heart.

wildphotographicyouth:

No matter where you go; Go with all your heart.

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New research suggests the global decline in wildlife is connected to an increase in human trafficking and child slavery.

Ecologists say the shortage of wild animals means that in many countries more labour is now needed to find food.

Children are often used to fill this need for cheap workers, especially in the fishing industry.

The decline in species is also helping the proliferation of terrorism and the destabilisation of regions.

According to a study in the journal, Science, the harvesting of wild animals from the sea and the land is worth $400bn annually and supports the livelihoods of 15% of the world’s population.

This is so sad — for wildlife, and children.

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08 May 2013

The Elephant at the Tower


The art of giving diplomatic gifts is an age-old tradition, practised by kings and queens, popes and emperors, presidents and prime ministers. But what to give?



That very question must have dawned on King Louis IX of France (reigned 1226-1270), when he was seeking a gift for Henry III of England (reigned 1216-1272) in 1255. How to impress the English king, and in the process give him something that he did not already have? The exchange was recorded by Matthew Paris, the chronicler of St Albans: “About this time, an elephant was sent to England by the French king as a present to the king of the English. We believe that this was the only elephant ever seen in England, or even in the countries this side of the Alps; thus people flocked together to see the novel sight.”
Paris wrote a short tract on the elephant, found in the Chronica maiora (Cambridge, Corpus Christi, MS 16). He had evidently seen the elephant for himself, and described its principal features, based on observation and deduction. The elephant was 10 years old (how to tell?), 10 feet high, grey-ish black with a tough hide, and used its trunk to obtain food and drink. It lived in a specially-constructed house at the Tower of London, 40 feet long by 20 feet wide, and its keeper was named Henry de Flor.
The image above is one of two of Henry III’s elephant drawn by Matthew Paris, and is found in his Liber Additamentorum or Book of Additional Things (British Library MS Cotton Nero D I). Suzanne Lewis, author of The Art of Matthew Paris, suggests that this is Matthew’s first attempt to draw the elephant, in part since it includes a second rendering of the trunk in a different position. As Lewis observes, the elephant is here “drawn horizonatally on the page in heavy brown line and tinted with similar dark grey and ochre washes … the details of the skin folds on the trunk and rear flanks, as well as the flap covering the upper part of the tusk, are more freshly observed and convincing that those in MS 16.” The assumption would seem to be that the elephant in the Liber Additamentorum was drawn from life, with the illustration in the Chronica maiora being based on the earlier drawing, perhaps with other sketches which have not survived.
Lewis also points out that both drawings of the elephant show that it had knee joints, contrary to the widespread medieval belief that the elephants’ knees were joint-less! You can read more about this phenomenon in our post Elephants on Parade.
For more about Matthew Paris and Henry III’s elephant, see Suzanne Lewis, The Art of Matthew Paris in the Chronica Majora (Aldershot: Scolar, 1987), pp. 212-16. There is a great blogpost by our friends at Corpus Christi College, Matthew Paris and the Elephant at the Tower, and you can access images from the famous Parker library here (subscription only).

[Source: British Library.]

08 May 2013

The Elephant at the Tower

The art of giving diplomatic gifts is an age-old tradition, practised by kings and queens, popes and emperors, presidents and prime ministers. But what to give?

That very question must have dawned on King Louis IX of France (reigned 1226-1270), when he was seeking a gift for Henry III of England (reigned 1216-1272) in 1255. How to impress the English king, and in the process give him something that he did not already have? The exchange was recorded by Matthew Paris, the chronicler of St Albans: “About this time, an elephant was sent to England by the French king as a present to the king of the English. We believe that this was the only elephant ever seen in England, or even in the countries this side of the Alps; thus people flocked together to see the novel sight.”

Paris wrote a short tract on the elephant, found in the Chronica maiora (Cambridge, Corpus Christi, MS 16). He had evidently seen the elephant for himself, and described its principal features, based on observation and deduction. The elephant was 10 years old (how to tell?), 10 feet high, grey-ish black with a tough hide, and used its trunk to obtain food and drink. It lived in a specially-constructed house at the Tower of London, 40 feet long by 20 feet wide, and its keeper was named Henry de Flor.

The image above is one of two of Henry III’s elephant drawn by Matthew Paris, and is found in his Liber Additamentorum or Book of Additional Things (British Library MS Cotton Nero D I). Suzanne Lewis, author of The Art of Matthew Paris, suggests that this is Matthew’s first attempt to draw the elephant, in part since it includes a second rendering of the trunk in a different position. As Lewis observes, the elephant is here “drawn horizonatally on the page in heavy brown line and tinted with similar dark grey and ochre washes … the details of the skin folds on the trunk and rear flanks, as well as the flap covering the upper part of the tusk, are more freshly observed and convincing that those in MS 16.” The assumption would seem to be that the elephant in the Liber Additamentorum was drawn from life, with the illustration in the Chronica maiora being based on the earlier drawing, perhaps with other sketches which have not survived.

Lewis also points out that both drawings of the elephant show that it had knee joints, contrary to the widespread medieval belief that the elephants’ knees were joint-less! You can read more about this phenomenon in our post Elephants on Parade.

For more about Matthew Paris and Henry III’s elephant, see Suzanne Lewis, The Art of Matthew Paris in the Chronica Majora (Aldershot: Scolar, 1987)pp. 212-16. There is a great blogpost by our friends at Corpus Christi College, Matthew Paris and the Elephant at the Tower, and you can access images from the famous Parker library here (subscription only).

[Source: British Library.]